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An introduction to designing mobile arcade games – in search of Space Monsters
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An introduction to designing mobile arcade games

Before I start to present some thumbnail views of potential mobile game designs I just want to recap a few thoughts on the control system and a rough structure for the design of each game.

So much in designing games for mobile (be it an app or a mobile web game) is dictated by the control system. The lack of buttons to press is both a blessing and a hinderance. Far too often with console games I’m left put off and baffled by the spaghetti-fingered controls so I find the relative immaturity of the touch screen interface refreshing.
But of course the moment you want your mobile on-screen character to walk, run, jump and shoot you have an issue.
As I’ve blogged many times before I never overlay a joystick and buttons.

I have several games that sit on my developer’s shelf just now that never made it beyond concept phase. In many cases this is due to continuing to scratch my head about the controls. Automating certain actions is the obvious way forward (player movment, auto-firing weapons…) and balancing this with giving the player something to control that relies on developing a skill is where the mobile game designer spends a good deal of his time.

Generally speaking I centre my games around a single “gimmick”. Something a bit quirky such as the pseudo-3D effect in Distant Orbit or the scrolling trench in Crossfire. For me it goes hand in hand with the formation of the central challenge.
Recently in Super Jet Boy I hit on the idea of controlling a character with thrust alone. As a boy I’d played Dropzone to death and wanted to emulate the way the spaceman rotates on the x-axis. This formed the core of the game for me.

Dropzone screenshot

Dropzone

In my design documents I always start with a small section called Gimmick :-)
I then expand on this to identify and develop the core challenge and any sub-challenges. The one thing that (if I got the design right) is never a challenge is the control itself.

So with my designs I will initially try to present a rough genre, style, visual style and high concept. I will then expand to explore what it is I want the player to actually achieve in the game and of course identify what it is that stands in his way. From this I expect a bunch of challenges to fall out and this is where the game starts to come to life. Exploring where the real fun of the game can be found should be fairly organic.

All questions welcome and of course if you have your own thoughts on mine or your own designs feel free to share them.

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