Taking on the app stores – step 1: Google

I’m on something of a mission to have my HTML5 arcade visible to the search engines. Naturally I’ve a number of keywords and phrases that I want to have positioned favourably in Google et al. My goal is to have phrases such as “free arcade games” on the first page of results and ideally “above the fold”.
To this end I’ve done a good deal of work in making sure that the site’s content is specific, relevant and perhaps most important of all unobtrusive to the player. I think I’ve achieved a reasonable balance.

Every once in a while I grab a coffee and spend 5 minutes punching in variations on my keywords in to Google.
The most recent search phrase was “free arcade games for ipad”.

Before I go on I must at this point pledge my love for Apple’s iPad. I’ve had an iPad since its launch and have very much fallen for its elegance, execution and simplicity. Contrary to popular opinion I also rather like its sandboxed nature. I’ve no intention to “jailbreak” it. There’s no need. Not for me. It does what I want it to do and then some. Most important of all though it plays HTML5 games like a dream.
So appearing favourably for a search phrase containing the words arcade, games and ipad is a key goal for my plans of 2014. Free is obviously also an important word since HTML5 games tend to be largely synonymous with free gaming just now. I guess that will change. It’s interesting that I’ve not identified HTML5 as a key search word just now. I’ve made some provision for it but until it becomes a key word in the mind of the public searching for games on their mobile I’m less concerned about it. That said part of my mission is to create that relationship amongst the gaming public with the words HTML5 and games.

So what do I get when I punch “free arcade games for ipad” in to Google?

Well, disregarding adverts, I get several results before my own site playstar.mobi is returned.
I set out to take a closer look at the links that preceed my own. Here’s some detail.

Results as at 21st February 2014

1. http://www.techradar.com/news/mobile-computing/tablets/60-best-free-ipad-games-692690
A very respectable list of free iPad games available from the app store. Very difficult to compete with as some of those games are AAA in iPad terms.

2. http://toucharcade.com/2013/12/25/best-free-iphone-and-ipad-games-of-2013/
Different games but the same premise. A list of very good quality games that you can install and enjoy for free before you hit the brick wall of In App Purchasing.

So far it’s hard to see where my humble little HTML5 games arcade could possibly fit in to the big world of iPad arcade gaming. But I’ll persevere.

3. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/namco-arcade/id465606050?mt=8
This time a direct link to some of the games that influenced me both as a boy and as a “grown up” game developer. Geez. This is getting tough. How on earth can I compete with this?

4. http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2373779,00.asp
Holy hell another list. This seems to be the way to get your pages ranked well. TechCrunch, TouchArcade, Apple and PCMag are all well ranked within Google so this is no surprise. It’s looking quite ominous a task.

5. http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-31747_7-20110992-243/the-best-free-ipad-games-period/
ANOTHER take on the best free iPad games available to us in 2013. It’s becoming very much a trend is this. I doubt the authors care a jot about what games are good and what are bad. They just want their site ranking well for these search phrases. “The best free ipad games, period“. Well if that’s not arrogant I don’t know what is. Arrogant link baiting. Wow. The internet sinks a level.
This list is different but really no different to the others, other than it ranks lower in Google’s index.

I offer some very simple arcade games that are based on a simple premise: shoot, dodge and blast your way to the top of the high score table. It’s old school and I’m starting to feel like I cannot compete.

6. http://ipad.about.com/od/Action-Arcade-Games/tp/The-Best-Action-Arcade-Games-For-The-iPad.htm
I couldn’t see a date alongside this entry. I think it may be a couple of years old given some of the titles on offer – “Rage” for example.
I quite like this list. It’s simple and honest. But still it points directly to the app store. HTML5 gaming hasn’t a sniff. Yet.

7. http://ipad.about.com/od/iPad_Games/u/A-Guide-To-iPad-Games-And-Gaming.htm
I didn’t delve too deep here but it looks like all the results of number 6 categorised. The author is the same. Yup, very much an SEO exercise.
“Daniel, get us listed up there with Techcrunch for free iPad games. We’re about.com for God’s sake. We need to be registering.”

8. http://iappguide.com/ipad/top-games/arcade-games/free
Hang on. This looks different. I’ve never heard of iappguide.com. These guys could well be HTML5 focused.
Alas, no. It’s another bunch of links to the app store. To its credit it looks pretty well maintained. Right now Flappy Bird is all the craze and there’s a bunch of “flappy” games on offer. No HTML5 but it’s a bit different. Credit to them for weighing in at number 8 but I’m not sure I’d install any of their listed games. It’s just a list and feels pretty pointless. i.e. content I could get just by going to the app store or reading one of the previous 7 lists.

Lists, lists, lists. There’s no experience to be had here. Just lists. If you play Google you can position yourself well but have limited relevance to your audience. I’m not convinced lists are what people searching with the word “arcade” are after. I’m possibly (and probably) wrong.

9. http://iphone.mob.org/genre/arkady/
Proceed with caution! I’m not convinced that this site is a friendly site.
It’s the first site on the list that offers games outside of the app store. Yup, you’ll need a jailbroken iPad for this lot.
If you’ve jailbroken your iPad you’ve really missed the point. You probably should have some form of Android detritus like a Nexus 7 or Samsung Galaxy Mega. Both fine bits of kit but for my money inferior to Apple’s offerings. Anyway, that’s technical opinion and I try to avoid that.
I don’t like this site. It’s just a bit “hey look at my adverts”. There’s no promise of an experience to be had here. Just a vehicle for ranking highly and splurging adverts at you.

10. http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/muo-free-ipad-games-addicting-arcade-edition/
Aaaand another list. A bunch of iPad games that somebody has hastily assembled without any real thought or care. Actually perhaps there was some care taken not to replicate what Techcrunch or About.com were offering.
This is a terrible list wrapped with some adverts. Again.

I must be close to being listed. Surely.

11. http://www.imore.com/namco-arcade-ios-freetoplay-classic-arcade-titles
205 words in this article. 205 words. The rest of the page is adverts and links to other site content. Those silly enough to fall for it have commented in the comments section. Jesus.
So for anyone genuinely looking for free arcade games to play on their iPad it’s looking pretty grim. Unless they’re happy with wading through a list of somebody’s opinion as to what’s good they’re not really going to get the “arcade” experience.
Perhaps that’s not important.
I perhaps need to think about this.
Most people surfing the web for games were probably born after the glory days of arcade gaming. Is it really right that I should harp on about the beauty of playing games and striving for the high score for the cost of a single coin?
Maybe not. I am quite possibly barking up the wrong tree. But that said I’m convinced that what was fun for me as a boy 30 years ago ought to be fun for today’s casual gamer. The challenge of a good arcade game with that single goal of dominating the high score table – the one thing that identified you as the “best” – has to be a worthwhile pursuit.

12. http://playstar.mobi/
HUZZAH! I made it. Amongst the endless lists of lists I made it.

So what does a searcher see for their “free arcade games for ipad”?
To better understand this I’m going to try and step inside the mind of the searcher. What kind of a person might want to find free arcade games for their ipad?

Free games for iPad is quite different to free arcade games for iPad. At least I think it is.
If you include the word arcade you’re looking for something quite specific. That’s not to say you’re looking for something from 30 years ago. Not at all. But you’re looking for a style of game that almost by definition is brief, challenging, entertaining and most likely pretty intense.
So far a few of those lists have thrown up their own results and a bunch of the games listed are very good. Very good indeed. But they’re not “classic” in their execution. Not necessarily.
So from this I deduce that what I want from my searcher is an unwritten desire to play “classic” arcade games.
To have my games returned without having to supply an extra (and arguably implied) keyword is good.
The person I want to be searching for “free arcade games for ipad” is an iPad owner (obviously) and somebody interested in (ideally) classic style arcade games from what I would call the golden era.
This is both useful and limiting.
Useful in that it provides a niche target audience to aim for an limiting in that it restricts me to that very same audience.
Nonetheless I am happy to target this audience.

So what words greet my searcher?

Well right now it’s

Free Mobile Arcade Games – HTML5 gaming – No Downloads, no installs | Play Where can I play games on my iPad, Android, iPhone or iPod Touch for free 

Woah. Look at that – HTML5 gaming.
If I can get this person to click they’ve suddenley (hopefully) made an association with free and/or arcade gaming and HTML5.
I’d be happy with either of those associations.
One day HTML5 will be a key search phrase for anyone looking for a particular style of game. Ideally “mobile” and possibly “free”. Whether that shifts to the stinking world of In App Purchasing remains to be seen but certainly the mobile angle is key.

Same game > any device. That has to be a winner. It is afterall our unique selling proposition to our audience.

Road Rage – New HTML5 arcade game

Road RageRoad Rage is finally complete.

I put a lot of work in to this one in terms of balancing the action versus rewarding the player with plenty of on-screen action.

I’m not really in to doing post-mortems on my games but for this one I’d say it’s come out pretty close to how I envisaged it. I made a decision early on to keep the pace up and allow the player a fair amount of freedom to move and blast things. To that end I litter the screen with explosions, bombs, bullets and debris.
I’m hoping that it’s well received enough to justify the extra effort :)

Ultimately the question of “is it fun?” has to be answered and I’d have to say that the feedback from testing that I’ve had is extremely positive. Most of the comments returned highlight the soundtrack, audio fx and big colourful sprites. I’m thrilled to read such encouraging comments since it pretty much underpins my ethos for making games. It’s certainly something that will carry over in to my book.

Road Rage

You can play the game over at the arcade. Sign up, sign in and shoot for the top spot. Let’s see how good you are!

Road Rage development update

In wrapping up the development of Road Rage I hit one or two snags. This annoys the hell out of me since it is largely due to big holes in the game’s design.

I’m a designer who likes to have the core stuff ironed out long before I get my hands dirty with code and graphics. The central mechanics of the game are the first thing I figure out and everything else gets built around it.
For Road Rage the central theme is the winding road that shifts at pace beneath the action and provides a rapidly changing restriction to the player’s movement. If the car veers off-road it incurs significant damage.

HTML5 arcade game screenshot

This all worked out well initially. I’d used the code base for Spy Chase as a foundation and built upon it with layers of activity. The problem was that the game was actually far too easy to play and I wasn’t willing to compromise any of the design features. 
The road movement look neat, the laser fire from the player’s car worked well, the missile fire from the enemy looked great and the explosions and special effects all added a wonderful depth to the game. But it was just too easy.
The player’s movement was limited but fairly swift in the x axis and his laser fire was rapid. This I liked. Everything played out smooth and it felt like the most complete arcade game I’d ever made. 
Injecting the time limit was a late addition and it really intensified the challenge. 

Then it occured to me that the fundamental issue was with the player’s ability to shield damage from bombs, cars and the off-road. This increased the player’s chance of survival through to the health regenerating Checkpoint between stages. 
I played with a few different means of punishing the player and settled on a single hit from a bullet or missile destroying the car. Bumping other cars and trucks took a small amount off the player’s “health” (pretty vital as bumping is a key feature in the game and a fair bit of fun) and running off-road added larger amounts of damage. I didn’t want to destroy the car for veering off road as in some cases it’s unavoidable. Better to add damage and encourage the player to return to the road at the earliest opportunity.

So the game dynamics are now set such that the player avoids enemy fire at all costs and shifts left and right to collect, dodge and shoot. So much so that you could pretty much remove the road and backdrop and it’d play out like an old school shoot ’em up. 

I think the game is a huge amount of fun and faithful to the arcade game designer’s ethos of short, challenging and intense fun for your coin. Hopefully it will encourage a high percentage of replays!

Road Rage will find its way to the PlayStar Arcade in the next week or so.

A selection of screens from my new HTML5 arcade game – Road Rage

I intend to complete this game very soon. I confess I’ve got a little carried away adding some special effects with sprites. The shards of metal that fly away from the damaged vehicles when struck with a missile or gun fire were just too tempting to resist.
I spawn them in the game with random trajectory, speed and spin rate. The effect is pretty neat. For the most part the metal shards whizz off the screen but occasionally you get a slower shard that just ambles off screen with a slow spin. It really adds to the impression of blasting everything to pieces. Hope to have the game completed over the Christmas break in time for new year.

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Balancing the action and using a classic for inspiration

Designing HTML5 arcade games with JavaScript has become something of a theraputic exercise. The combined thrills of pixelling, coding and designing the various elements of the action are proving to be quite useful in the stressful run up to Christmas.
Yet despite this I now find myself in that unavoidable “crunch” mode on two projects. I also set a target to finish these two projects by the new year.

A laugh at it now but I shelved my first project as it approached completion to pursue a fresh project. It was of course a diversion. I was deliberately avoiding the pain of that final 10% that takes an agonising amount of time to complete. Now I have doubled the pain!

It’s not all bad.
The discipline of developing arcade games has evolved and tightened over the years to become almost formulaic. This in itself isn’t always a good thing but it can be useful to have a blueprint for design when it comes to balancing, testing and code fixing.

For the most part at this stage I find that the raw code is cut and I’m largely playing with numbers. I play the games A LOT and talk to myself as I’m running through them – always making notes. Here’s such a conversation :)

There’s just not enough to challenge me here. The player character moves too quickly to be threatened by the bad guys. The bad guys need to target the player more. There’s too much room to move. The player isn’t developing any skills in his movement and bullet / entity dodging!

I kid you not. This was a recent note I took.
The beauty of all of this is that everything in the game is defined by numerics. The player’s movement is defined as a speed parameter that allows his co-ordinates to increment each tick. Similarly the other objects in the game perform against the same calculations. In the driving / shooting game (which I currently call Road Rage) the room in which the player has for movement is defined by the road object’s width and height. I applied a .nextthink attribute to the road container which ticks down every game tick. At zero I make another decision on how to scale and move the road.
With this method I can shrink or expand the road with ease after an elapsed amount of time. As a result of my testing and observations above I could see that the road needed to narrow more frequently. The player’s car going “offroad” results in a lot of damage and consequently Game Over so a shrinking road is a real challenge to the player.

HTML5 arcade game

As you can see in the screenshot the road is divided up in to slices. Each “slice” is an object that contains parameters for the ground texture, the road, the road’s verge and the lines that run down the middle.
The only artwork on display per slice is the ground and verge. The other two elements are solid colour blocks.

The tree decorations that overlay the ground are sprite objects and behave in a default sprite behaviour. i.e. emerge off screen, run the length and disappear without any collision detection.

Developing the shifting road wasn’t really much of a challenge. You could almost imagine the process as a series of around a dozen rectangular cards placed in order. By altering the x position of each road object as it is spawned off the top of the canvas (and subsequently allowing the object to increment its co-ordinate) you can create a satisfactory rippling effect that simulates the shifting road. The road width (the solid colour area) is known and therefore I can plot x co-ordinates for the overlayed verges.
Similarly any sprite object that sits on the road can be tested to see whether it has over-run the verge in which case I apply damage to it. Too much damage and it is destroyed. The impact on the random military vehicles in the game is a key part of the appeal as the player’s gleaming red sports car (modelled on a Ferrari 458!) can bump them off the road with a few well timed swerves in the right direction :)

For a long time in the early days of development I was playing the game and struggling to find a core mechanic for it. That vital element of the game that forms the player’s goal or goals. I knew that arming a sports car with rockets and allowing it to shunt other vehicles off the road would be fun, but as always I wanted an intensity to the action that meant there would be a ton of rockets and bombs on the screen. This can cause design problems in terms of setting a challenge since firing a huge amount of rockets and lasers only works if the stuff you’re aiming at is destroyed! It’s no good if the targets just bounce around a bit and are unaffected by your gunfire.

So I dabbled with all sorts of mechanics including collecting valuable items and avoiding oil slicks. They just didn’t work. The thrill of the game is in its pace and causing the car to spin or forcing the player to swerve and collect items just didn’t add up to very much fun. It needed to be a high octane experience with shooting, dodging, turboing and explosions set against an underlying need for speed.

So I fired up Out Run for a little inspiration. A wonderful game from the 1980s in which you drive a car at speed across an undulating terrain whilst avoiding other road users. The game is divided in to stages such that when you cross a checkpoint you are rewarded with a little more time to play.
This did it for me. It was obvious. A game in which you drive a car has to be a challenge of beating the clock.

I could still get away with blasting the bad guys I just needed to ensure that the core goal was to complete each stage in a set amount of time. Adding a timer was simple. I set it to 30 seconds initially and ticked down every second. At zero the car exploded and the game was over.

So the next question was how do I speed the car up and slow it down without having specific controls overlaid on the touchscreen.
This was a no-brainer. I implemented a turbo accumulator. The destruction of cars and military vehicles spawned turbo collectables that bounced around the screen. By collecting several of these the player built up their turbo bar sufficiently to engage a short (10 second) turbo mode in which the car’s speed doubled. The faster the car the quicker the player zoomed through each stage. So there was plenty of incentive for the player to destroy the other vehicles and go collecting the turbo shards.

But this wasn’t enough of a challenge. I wanted to add an element of dodging to the game so I stuck with the idea of the other vehicles launching missiles at the player. One hit and the car was destroyed! Unlike off-road damage or bumping the other cars, missile damage didn’t reduce the player’s “health”. It just wiped them out.

So I’m now confident that I have the game that I was after. As I play it now it’s pretty close to the original design and with the injection of the pulsating soundtrack and over-the-top sound effects I think it’s easily the best arcade game I’ve made to date.

I look forward to sharing it within the PlayStar Arcade shortly.

Building your own mobile web gaming portal – the games

I think that it probably goes without saying  that your games are your primary asset. They are the key to the success of your portal. Treating your games as such is a pretty good step toward achieving your goal of becoming a reasonably sized independent arcade.

It doesn’t take an astro-physicist to calculate that you stand a greater chance of repeat plays in your arcade if you have something worthwhile to offer.

Making sure you have enough quality in your games to keep a player engaged, challenged, entertained and ultimately rewarded enough to come back for more is of course a challenge in itself.
I have 15 games available. Some work well. Generally the older style shooting games. Some don’t work so well. For those that don’t work so well I am analysing the performance statistics to see if there’s anything I can do to improve the experience.

I think it’s probably worth exploring the world of mobile gaming in general and not just focusing on the burgeoning mobile web market. With a little investigation of the mobile gaming world at large we can probably get a good feel for what gamers will want and expect from a gaming portal.

Here’s a few key points.

Design with replayability in mind

Something that the arcade game designers of yesteryear proved to be very good at was designing enough to challenge and entertain the gamer whilst leaving enough behind to warrant another “go”.

This is of course linked to the need for a very visible and realistic target. In the arcades this target was ultimately a high score and the bragging rights that accompany having your name or initials flashing the brightest in the high score table.
But a good arcade game was split in to smaller more bite-sized chunks.

Scramble

Scramble arcade game

Consider Scramble. A tricky game and one that took most gamers a good amount of coins to master. The premise was simple: shoot, dodge, swoop and navigate your way through a deep scrolling maze. The game would throw more and more at you until your were hit or collided with a rock or a wall. It was intense and hugely challenging.

The ultimate goal was to take that top score. This was, in the early 1980s, very much a cultural thing. Gamers in those days would spend play times in school bragging about their scores. Although perhaps that has become less of a draw to modern gamers it is still very relevant to pitch your skills against your buddies.

Yet despite all of this I do believe that as gamers we invest an incredible amount on a personal level when we play. To that end I love the idea of designing stages within a game that must be conquered. On a personal level the gamer must go just one step beyond where they were in the previous “go”. Once this is achieved their attention turns back to the score.

“Right I beat that little challenge now what score do I get as a reward?”

So with that in mind I always try and design games that break down in to stages and also offer a wide range of points values for accomplishments therein.

In a later post I’ll go in to some detail of how I get data in and out of the games and in to a database.

Offering a niche

When I first set out to make mobile web games I knew that I wanted to make arcade games. Specifically the style of game that I grew up playing. They still to this day hold the most appeal.
As a result every game that I have in my arcade is an old-school style arcade game.

Just to ram the point home I even called the portal the PlayStar Arcade. I want gamers to identify with the portal as a source of arcade games. In my next post I’ll talk in some depth about the importance of branding your site.

So when a gamer comes to my arcade to play an arcade game they know roughly what they’re about to experience. The action is brief, repetetive and very much a throw back to the games of 25 years ago. This may not always be a good thing but I think on balance the decision to aim for this niche was a good one. I am engaging a certain type of player and my audience figures and play stats appear to show an increasing audience with a greater willingness to replay.

Something’s working!

I’m always reading about the importance of variety in a game designer’s portfolio. This is probably sound advice but it must be in line with your goals. It isn’t my goal to become a freelancing game designer. I just want to manage and administer my own niche arcade. I applaud those who are able to adapt to changes in the market and stay one step ahead. But it’s not for me. I guess you have to decide what is right for you and what your goals for your portal and your design ambitions are.

Rewards, rewards, rewards

This is a short and sweet one. Make the gamer feel good about playing your game. Reward everything that she does both visually and audibly (where possible). Don’t just display a “well done”. Shower the screen with tiny stars and let the little on-screen character do a little dance. Your gamers will remember it and come craving that feel-good experience in the future.

Screenshots, blurb, action and a challenge

This is a big one. I’m willing to bet that the primary reason for somebody clicking to play your game when it’s sat amongst a sea of games is the screenshot that is used to advertise it. In fact whether it’s a screenshot or an icon make damn sure that what you’re showing is the game’s key selling point.

If your game is a driving game don’t just show a stock image of a steering wheel with the name of your game over it. Show an in-game shot (or an adapted version of it) of a vehicle on the road in an interesting setting.

This of course links back to how you design your games. Designing with a screenshot in mind is no bad thing. When you construct your games try to visualise how it’s going to look sat alongside all of the other games in your arcade.

Those old enough to remember the glory days of arcade gaming will remember the artwork on the cabinets. The image of electro-invaders on the side of the Space Invaders cabinet or the bright yellow Pac-Man set against the largely blue hue of the maze that was in the masthead; both instantly identifiable and designed to pull the gamer in.

Similarly think about how you “talk” to the gamer. You want him to click and play. Give him something to fire his imagination. Calling a game Shoot the bridges is possibly not going to inspire a young boy’s imagination in the same way that River Raid does.

River raider

River Raider HTML5 arcade game

In my own game River Raider I wrote a small introductory paragraph which read:

Fly fast and low and blast everything to pieces. Your mission: destroy ALL bridges along the mighty river and neutralise the enemy threat. But watch your fuel and steer clear of the rocks. If you’re good there’s rank and glory to play for.

I worked hard to try and capture a young boy’s imagination and give him some motivation to jump in and play. I’d hoped that with just a few words somebody might pick up that gauntlet and take up the challenge of destroying bridges and blasting “everything to pieces”.
It also serves as a neat way to present at a glance what the player can expect when they press the start button.

So that’s it. A few starters based upon my own experiences designing games and attracting gamers in to play them.
In future posts I’ll go in to a little more detail about branding your portal and acquiring traffic. I’ll also discuss the tricky problem of converting casual visitors in to loyal gamers.

HTML5 arcade driving and shooting game – short demo video

I installed the Camtasia Studio over the weekend and captured a few short videos of my development projects.
I couldn’t resist sharing the video for Road Rage as it captures everything I ever wanted in a game: colour, chaos, rich audio and a ton of explosions. Yup, I have an explosion fetish! The more the better. The louder the bang the better. In fact the more intense the on-screen action the better.

I hope to have it completed soon and upload it to the PlayStar Mobile Arcade where gamers can test their skills against one another and compete for the high score :-)

Road Rage – HTML5 arcade, driving, explosion-fest shooting game – screenshots

Some screenshots from my forthcoming arcade, driving, shooter, explosion-fest Road Rage. There’s some obvious rendering glitches and tiling to address but hopefully you can still get a feel for what the game is all about.

Here is the single sentence that I have guiding me through the game’s design:

So you stole the military’s top secret armoured stealth buggy and they want it back. But you’re having too much fun just to hand it over! Tanks, armoured cars, choppers, missiles… surely it’ll take more than that for you to surrender :)

I had a handful of images from Capcom’s Loop Master arcade game as visual reference whilst I was drawing the sprites and background art.
I think the Capcom colour scheme and striking explosion style has come out well.

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Using HTML5 games to tell a story

I always wanted to use games to tell a story. Over the years I’ve scribbled down a ton of story ideas that might lend themselves to gaming and never really done much about it.

kyle cometMy current project involves a fourteen year old space hero and his fight to save the planet from an evil scientist / aggressor. Standard stuff. The kid is of course an ace starfighter pilot and perfectly capable of getting himself in to a scrape or two.
I guess the point of the exercise was to create a framework whereby the player could enjoy the action and just have the story unfold behind the scenes. To that end I am trying to stitch together a bunch of different arcade styles to keep the player entertained whilst the story is being told.

In some respects the story is irrelevant and in others it is pretty key. It’s also a useful dynamic for leading the player in to a situation and teaching them how the game should be played. To better accomplish this I’ve built in achievements.
So for example, in the first chapter of the story the hero is faced with a deep space minefield. The mines can be destroyed and for each mine that is destroyed a ton of energy is released. The more energy that is collected by the player the more charge goes in to the starfighter’s super laser. When the super laser is fully charged the player can reap havoc on anything that comes close.
This is clearly going to be of some use throughout the game so for the first chapter’s challenge I use it. i.e. Challenge #1 – collect enough energy to power your starfighter’s super laser.

If the player doesn’t achieve this it matters not. It’s purely a bonus. But I imagine that most players will achieve this as it is very simple. Not to mention hugely rewarding.

To drive the story I’ve created some cool characters.
The main character (the player’s character) is young Kyle. Kyle Comet to give him his full title. The somewhat precocious product of the Deep Space Academy that appears to know no fear.
His best friend and radio assistant is Lexa. A young girl who keeps an eye on the galaxy for trouble. She is an extra pair of eyes and ears for Kyle and operates from the safety of the space station.
The bad guy is one General Vore. A former scientist and good guy. A big brain and now a huge threat. He was cast out of the peaceful planet Tranquis (this appeared in a previous game) that Kyle and Lexa call home and now plots to return and take the entire planet for himself. Not only that he’s amased a sizeable army to help him.

Making games is a huge amount of fun. Making games to tell a story is just thrilling. I am at heart a story teller. I love games but I love crafting stories and adventures just as much.

I intend for this story to be the first in a series of stories that chronicle the life of my deep space hero Kyle Comet. Just now I call it Kyle Comet and the Dreaded General Vore. A pretty lame title but it gives me something to work with whilst I complete the game.

Hope to have it ready by new year.

Electromaster – awesome iOS shooter game with single touch controls that work

A game that I’ve enjoyed a huge amount of late is Electromaster. It carries that irresistable blend of retro, arcade action and compelling gameplay.

Electromaster Electromaster screenshot.
 

The premise is simple. You control your electro zapping character as she walks around the screen and press and hold the screen to charge the weapon. When you release the weapon fires and you can then control that weapon by sliding your finger around the screen. The longer you can hold on (the screen rapidly fills with enemies and one collision halts your charge and depletes your health) the longer the weapon fires for.

Using your electro charge you must zap the enemies until they disappear off the screen.

It has that same frenzied sense that Robotron had many moons ago. But I guess the beauty of this game is that there are no overlaid controls. For that reason alone I play it pretty much every day. In fact my daughter and me are in serious competition! It comes with bonuses and power-ups and just, well, delivers. Even better it has a scoring system that quickly runs to the millions. Great game.

I like it so much I’m going to attempt to emulate it in JavaScript. I hope I can do it justice.

Update: check out the author’s web site http://xionchannel.blogspot.com/ and other game – Hungry Master.

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